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Intel Officially Launch 8th Gen G-Series With Vega-M Graphics - Faster Than GeForce GTX 1060
By Jon Sutton on January 8th, 2018 at 12:44pm - original article from game-debate

Intel has just used CES 2018 to deliver a monstrous shake-up of the APU industry. It’s officially launched its first 8th generation Intel Core i5 and i7 APUs with dedicated Radeon RX Vega M graphics. Astoundingly, the top-end Radeon RX Vega M can deliver performance capable of going toe-to-toe with a GeForce GTX 1060.

The 8th Gen APUs are a little different than those that have come before in that they offer an Intel CPU and a discrete GPU from AMD on a single EMIB (Embedded Multi-Die Interconnect Bridge). This allows for the APU to be both smaller and thinner, with the overall footprint shrinking 50% compared to a traditional design.

Intel Vega EMIB

Now for the all-important graphics processors themselves. AMD’s Vega M is available in two variants - RX Vega M GL and RX Vega M GH. Vega GL is targeted at laptops, while GH is designed for slimline desktops and entertainment centers. Of the two, the RX Vega M GL runs slower, although both pack some impressive gaming performance well in excess of what we’ve come to expect from APUs.

The laptop Vega M GL is packing with 20 Compute Units and 1280 Cores clocked at 1011MHz Boost Clock, while the desktop Vega M GH has 24 CU’s, 1536 Cores and a Boost Clock speed of 1190MHz. Both come with 4GB HBM2 memory on a 1024-bit memory interface. In terms of raw performance, the Radeon RX Vega M GH is 42% faster than the Radeon RX Vega M GL.

AMD Radeon RX Vega M GPUs

 

AMD Radeon RX Vega M GH Graphics

AMD Radeon RX Vega M GL Graphics

Process Node

14nm FinFET

14nm FinFET

Compute Units

24 CUs

20 CUs

Stream Processors

1536 SPs

1280 SPs

TMUs / ROPs

96 / 64

80 / 32

Base Clock

1063 MHz

931 MHz

Boost Clock

1190 MHz

1011 MHz

FP32 Performance

3.7 TFLOPs

2.6 TFLOPs

VRAM

4 GB HBM2

4 GB HBM2

Memory Bus

1024-bit

1024-bit

Memory Clock

1.6 Gbps

1.4 Gbps

Memory Bandwidth

204.8 GB/s

179.2 GB/s

But what does this all this mean in terms of real-world performance? Well, it’s pretty great. The laptop Radeon RX Vega M GL runs the Hitman benchmark at roughly 40% higher frame rates than a GeForce GTX 1050 paired with an Intel Core i7-7700.

Intel 8th Gen Radeon RX Vega M GL GPU

The Radeon RX Vega GH is even better, running 10% faster than a GeForce GTX 1060 Max-Q edition with an Intel Core i7-7700HQ processor.

Intel 8th Gen Radeon RX Vega M GH APU

That’s hugely impressive and means Intel’s latest APUs are capable of cranking up AAA games to High at 1080p with extremely solid frame rates. One thing to keep in mind though is these are based purely on Intel benchmarks, all of which are obviously hand-picked to shine a positive light on Team Blue. We don’t expect final performance to vary greatly from these figures though.

As for the CPUs that are going to be paired with these graphics chips, Intel is bringing five to the market. The full line-up includes the Intel Core i5-8350G, the Intel Core i7-8805G, Intel Core i7-8806G, Intel Core i7-8709G and the highest-end Intel Core i7-8809G. All five are quad-core with multithreading, with the only difference being the clock speeds and Radeon graphics chips.

The Intel Core i5-8305G, Core i7-8805G, and Core i7-8806G are all designed to laptops first and foremost. The i5 is clocked at 2.8GHz Base, 3.8 GHz Boost, while both of the Core i7’s are 3.1GHz Base, 4.1GHz Boost. All three feature the lower-end Radeon RX Vega M GL GPU, as well as Intel HD 630 graphics. Confusingly, the specs for the two i7’s are absolutely identical, so we’re not entirely sure what differentiates them just yet.

Intel’s newest APU range is then capped off by the Core i7-8709G and the Core i7-8809G. These are much the same as the other i7 APUs, although they come with the faster AMD Radeon RX Vega M GH graphics.

Intel 8th-Gen G-Series APUs

 

Intel Core i7-8809G

Intel Core i7-8709G

Intel Core i7-8706G

Intel Core i7-8705G

Intel Core i5-8305G

Boost Clock

4.2GHz

4.1GHz

4.1GHz

4.1GHz

3.8GHz

Base Clock

3.1GHz

3.1GHz

3.1GHz

3.1GHz

2.8GHz

Cores/Threads

4/8

4/8

4/8

4/8

4/8

Cache

8MB

8MB

8MB

8MB

6MB

Radeon Graphics

RX Vega M GH

RX Vega M GH

RX Vega M GL

RX Vega M GL

RX Vega M GL

CUs/Shaders

24/1536

24/1536

20/1280

20/1280

20/1280

Base/Boost GPU Clocks

1063/1190MHz

1063/1190MHz

931/1011MHz

931/1011MHz

931/1011MHz

Peak Compute

Up to 3.7TF

Up to 3.7TF

Up to 2.6TF

Up to 2.6TF

Up to 2.6TF

ROPs

64

64

32

32

32

HBM2 Bandwidth

204.8GB/s

204.8GB/s

179.2GBs/

179.2GBs/

179.2GBs/

Target TDP

100W

100W

65W

65W

65W

Intel has said the 8th-Gen APUs with Radeon RX Vega M graphics will begin creeping out to stores in Spring 2018, meaning any sort of time within the next four months or so. The other major point to consider is pricing, which hasn't been disclosed yet. It's crucial Intel comes in with aggressive pricing for these chips, particularly for the APUs designed for desktops. At the very least these processors need to price match the cost of an equivalent CPU plus GPU and ideally be cheaper. 

What do you make of Intel and AMD's collaboration? What price do these APUs need to hit in order to be a success? Get predicting below!